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Kiss, Kiss

traduction anglaise de Le Bisou, Pajama Press, 2015, illustré par Jacques Laplante

 

 

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Isobel Lang, Resource Links, mis en ligne par Pajama Press le 22 décembre 2015

This very sweet and simple tale describes many types of kisses in a language very young children will understand and appreciate—e.g. ‘You can do it once, or twice. 100 times is very nice.’ Each type of kiss illustrates the different varieties of relationships to parents, grandparents, pets etc., found in a small child’s life.

The cartoon illustrations are cheerful and warm with touches of humour. The story is good for babies and toddlers.

 

 

 

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 Kirkus Review, mis en ligne le 3 novembre 2015

Kisses can do so much: from sending love and healing boo-boos to saying hello and goodbye and good morning and good night. And then there are the kinds of kisses: wet ones, big ones, pecks, slurpy ones, and the ones that leave lipstick marks behind. “When grownups kiss it may look sappy. / Well, they’re in love—and very happy.”

While Couëlle’s verse changes rhythm and rhyming pattern on a whim (and not all of it rhymes), this matches the flighty topic of love and kisses (and also may reflect the fact that this is a translation of Le bisou from the French). And Laplante’s simple illustrations, which appear to be digital, are similarly whimsical, more rough sketches with color that often extends beyond its lines. A full range of relationships are represented here—parents, grandparents, couples, friends are all happily smooching. And people are not the only kissers in these pictures: fish and birds kiss, and a baby shares kisses with a dog.

“Because a day without kissing / has something missing.” (Picture book. 2-6)

 

 

 

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Nikita Griffioen, CM Magazine,  23 octobre 2015

Kiss, Kiss is the newest work from French author Jennifer Couëlle, illustrated by Jacques Laplante. This book was translated from French into English.

Kiss, Kiss is a book that relates to a feeling all readers know and desire, the feeling of being loved. In particular, Couëlle demonstrates the power of kisses. The prose highlights all different kinds of kisses, like air kisses: "They fly through the air and land on you" (p. 7), as well as "Hello" and "Goodbye" kisses (p. 12), and even noisy kisses, among others. Along with types of kisses, the prose also highlights the power of a kiss, itself: "They dry up your tears as quick as can be" (p. 9). Couëlle's gentle reminders of the magic of kisses are simply and poetically rendered on each page. The story, though translated from French, still holds a slight charming rhyme.

Jacques Laplante's illustrations are the perfect mix of vibrant colour and black lines that enhance the playfulness of Couëlle's story. Laplante's artistic style is reminiscent of Quentin Blake, with messy pen strokes and dashes of bright hues. The artist aptly chose a lot of red and pink tones throughout the drawings which amp up the feeling of being surrounded by love. Laplante's fun illustrations wonderfully accent Couëlle's verse.

Jennifer Couëlle's Kiss, Kiss is a book that should be read to remind listeners of how loved they are, as well as how powerful a kiss can be. Kiss, Kiss would also make a wonderful gift book, whether to a child, friend, or significant other—no matter who the reader may be, the ultimate message of the story will not be lost: love is important.

 

 

 

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Publishers Weekly, mis en ligne le 12 octobre 2015

Couëlle and Laplante celebrate kisses, be they big or small, quick or “slurpy.” Both the writing and artwork have a sweetly haphazard quality—Laplante’s scraggly illustrations look authentically kid-drawn, the meter of Couëlle’s verse varies wildly, and she sneaks in a few extemporaneous unrhymed moments. “Some kisses make noises: big ones like... smooch! And little ones like... peck!” she writes as a startled dog’s ear raises in alarm while a doting grandmother kisses her granddaughter’s forehead. Whether kisses are meant to mitigate soccer injuries or signal hello or goodbye, Couëlle and Laplante make it clear that “a shower of kisses never misses.” Ages 3–6. (Dec.)

 

 

 

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© jennifer couëlle 2017

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